Peace & Recovery

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In this Image A photo of Kutupalong Refugee Camp in Bangladesh. © 2018 Sebastian Chaskel

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Research Findings

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Employment has psychosocial value among refugees in Cox’s Bazaar

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Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh are severely limited by regulations outlawing formal work, in addition to movement restrictions that limit access to nearby informal work, potentially contributing to poor mental health outcomes. This randomized evaluation examined the effects of employment on psychosocial wellbeing and found that employment delivers significant psychosocial wellbeing, particularly among men. Moreover, a weekly cash provision of equal value did not improve psychosocial wellbeing, and 66 percent of those who worked were willing to forego cash payments for working. The results can be used to inform social protection policies for the unemployed in low income countries and refugee populations globally.

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Inter-religious soccer teams can improve tolerance in post-conflict Iraq

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As conflict forcibly displaces millions of people, social ties and trust across groups can disintegrate and be difficult to rebuild after violence subsides. Positive and cooperative intergroup contact has the potential to reduce prejudice and improve relationships with outgroup members. Researchers evaluated the impact of mixed Christian-Muslim soccer teams on social cohesion and interactions between these groups in an ISIS-affected area of Iraq. Results indicate that Christians who played on mixed teams demonstrated a higher likelihood of engaging with Muslim teammates after the league ended. However, personal beliefs were harder to modify—the intervention did not improve their overall tolerance toward the Muslim community.

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Men, women, and children stand on a street in Liberia. © 2010 Glenna Gordon

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Behavioral therapy and cash transfers reduced criminal behavior among high-risk men in Liberia

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Urban crime and violence is one of the most costly and divisive issues facing cities around the world. Short-term studies have demonstrated that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective way to reduce violence and criminality among adolescents and young adults. To understand the long-term effectiveness of CBT, researchers evaluated the impact of a CBT program and unconditional cash transfers on the behavior of high-risk young men in Liberia. Results demonstrated that CBT with or without cash reduced the likelihood of aggressive and criminal behavior among participants and improved some measures of self-control and self-image. CBT plus cash amplified and prolonged these benefits. Cash alone reduced crime in the short-run, but effects dissipated within a year.

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Related Topics

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Forced Displacement

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IPA's Humanitarian and Forced Displacement Initiative aims to improve the lives of those who have been forcibly displaced and the communities that host them by developing evidence that equips policymakers and practitioners to implement better policies and programs.

Conflict

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Conflict leads to development setbacks across all sectors of society. IPA’s research in conflict-affected contexts aims to both prevent conflict and help communities recover from its effects.

Crime

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There is limited rigorous evidence on the best ways to prevent, manage, and reduce crime. IPA supports research that explores the relationship between state legitimacy and crime, seeks to better understand organized crime, and evaluates novel strategies to combat crime and violence.

Crisis

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Responding to and preventing all types of crises is key to improving the lives of the poor, especially in fragile states. IPA’s work on crisis prevention and response includes evaluations related to natural, health, and human-made disasters.

Violence

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IPA’s research seeks to understand and respond to several types of violence, including terrorism, state-supported violence and repression, and ethnic and sectarian violence.

Peace & Recovery

Our Team

Peace & Recovery

Our Team

Director

Ricardo Morel

Ricardo is the Program Director for IPA's Peace & Recovery Program. He previously served as Country Director for IPA's Myanmar country office, managing IPA’s projects in Myanmar and leading the development of new research opportunities.

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Program Manager

Nessa Kenny

Nessa manages the Peace & Recovery Program's competitive research fund and supports the program's policy outreach, project development, communications, and fund development activities.

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Senior Program Associate

Daphne Schermer

Daphne is a Senior Program Associate for IPA's Peace & Recovery (P&R) Program, coordinating P&R’s competitive fund for research and active research portfolio and supporting policy outreach, communications, fundraising, and project development.

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Project Manager

Irina Siminichina

Irina manages the Social Cohesion in Divided Societies Research project aimed at informing social cohesion programming strategies.

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Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Michelle Twali

Michelle Twali is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Peace & Recovery program at IPA and Princeton University. Her work focuses on intergroup conflict, structural violence, and conflict resolution, with particular attention towards the experiences of members of the victim group.

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Director

Ricardo Morel

Ricardo is the Program Director for IPA's Peace & Recovery Program. He previously served as Country Director for IPA's Myanmar country office, managing IPA’s projects in Myanmar and leading the development of new research opportunities.

Read Full Bio

Program Manager

Nessa Kenny

Nessa manages the Peace & Recovery Program's competitive research fund and supports the program's policy outreach, project development, communications, and fund development activities.

Read Full Bio

Senior Program Associate

Daphne Schermer

Daphne is a Senior Program Associate for IPA's Peace & Recovery (P&R) Program, coordinating P&R’s competitive fund for research and active research portfolio and supporting policy outreach, communications, fundraising, and project development.

Read Full Bio

Project Manager

Irina Siminichina

Irina manages the Social Cohesion in Divided Societies Research project aimed at informing social cohesion programming strategies.

Read Full Bio

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Michelle Twali

Michelle Twali is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Peace & Recovery program at IPA and Princeton University. Her work focuses on intergroup conflict, structural violence, and conflict resolution, with particular attention towards the experiences of members of the victim group.

Read Full Bio